“Anarchy” Lexicon and Informational Reference 08/26/15

This is a go-to reference page for understanding the terms and technical details of my web-serial “Anarchy.”  Herein, I’ll provide a little more exhaustive detail that might have been otherwise left out of the story for sake of not encumbering the narrative.  There is also a museum with basic character details, including both the ‘anarchists’ and the in-game characters such as Brave.  Details will be added and modified as the series furthers.

Firstly, to those familiar with the Super Smash Bros. game series, it should come as no surprise that the fundamental mechanics of Anarchy are practically a rehash of that IP with new terms so as to avoid copyright issues.  In particular, it is supposed to have the look and flow of the most recent iteration: Super Smash Bros. 4 Wii U.  I can hear the Melee diehards from here.  That’s okay.  You guys are welcome, too.

In other words, if you are not familiar with Super Smash Bros. and want to have a visual reference for what I’m trying to explain in the course of the story, Youtube some of the gameplay.  “Smash 4 ZeR0 versus…” should be enough to get you started.

Moving on.

General Knowledge

Like Smash 4, “Anarchy” is a game which is processed at sixty frames-per-second, which means it is a highly detailed and fluid experience in regards to the precision of movements and actions.  Fine motor control and cognitive proficiency are both required to be an excellent anarchist.  Easy to pick up, difficult to master, it’s fundamentally a sandbox fighting game.  Unlike other 2D fighters, you come up with your own combos, using an understanding of the game’s physics.

‘Damage Debt’ (commonly referred to as ‘DD’) is the number which tracks accumulated damage on characters.  It is ever present beneath the character icons, just beside the remaining stock (‘life’) count.  The maximum possible DD is 1,000.  As Debt accumulates, characters receive more knockback and fly further with each consecutive damage point taken.  If a character flies too far off the stage and outside of the screen, they hit the ‘blast zone’ and lose a stock.  There is a small gap of space between the limits of the screen where the player may see the character and the blast zone known as the ‘borderlands’, where the character accumulates rapid sums of Debt and cannot be seen.

Competitive “Anarchy” is played in one of three modes.  The first is ‘Classic Anarchy’, which pits both players against each other in old-fashioned one-on-one combat.  The second is ‘Unity’, which divides players into teams of two-on-two or three-on-one.  The third is ‘Crew Attrition’, which also incorporates team strategy, albeit in a different way than Unity.  During Attrition gameplay, each team creates a line-up of players who will face off in one-on-one matches.  As players are beaten, an individual from their side will replace them with a fresh slate and character, while their opponents maintain the same number of lives.  The idea is to think of each team as one large-bodied machine that must be broken down piece by piece before finally destroyed.

While there are over twenty-five playable arenas in Anarchy, most tournaments select from only eight regarding competitive play.  These arenas are comparatively flat and devoid of obstacles that could interrupt or dynamically alter the flow of battle, making them decidedly the most ‘fair’.

Anarchy has a roster of thirty playable characters, thirty-four if you count the few with transformative abilities.  All of these characters are officially divided into three classified tiers, which act as a cornerstone for understanding the quality and effectiveness of each character.  These three tiers are, in descending order: A-tier, B-tier, C-tier, D-tier and E-tier.

The Controls

There are many technical words and phrases throughout “Anarchy” regarding the in-game combat.  Knowledge of what these mean or how they function are unnecessary to understanding the narrative at large, but help detail the course of the action for those who are familiar with Super Smash Bros.

I will help translate some of these phrases so a larger audience may understand them, as well as put simple terms into scope.  You do not need to memorize these to follow “Anarchy,” they simply add substance.  First know, there are only three primary buttons used to deal damage in Anarchy: a standard attack, a special attack, and grapples.  Each of these three buttons can then be used independently, or in conjunction with a directional input to activate a different technique.  Special attacks for example can be referred to as “Down-special” or “Neutral-special,” the latter being a special attack without any directional command.

Standard attacks have more room for variety, as they account not only for changes in directional input, but how far the analogue stick is pushed in that direction.  Slight adjustments in direction while pressing the standard attack button bare something known both in Smash and Anarchy as a ‘tilt,’ which is generally weak, but good for combos.  If the analogue stick is pushed to its fullest, it results in what Anarchy calls a ‘buster’ (Smashers would simply call this a ‘Smash’).  Busters can be held for a short time to increase damage and knockback on the ground.  When standard attacks are used in the air, they create yet more techniques and cannot be held for busters.  Three examples of different standard attacks are as follows: “Up-tilt,” “Up-buster,” “Up-air.”

It will be impossible for me to outline every single technical maneuver and vernacular of Anarchy (Heck, I’m still learning them for Smash), but here I will give several of the most prominent and noteworthy terms for your reference.  If you are familiar with Smash, you’ll notice many of them are shameless copies of the original source material:

“Hitbox” – The area of an attack where damage is dealt to the opponent.  If somebody uses an attack that’s a kick, typically the hitbox is the direction and length of the leg doing the kick.

“Hurtbox” – The area of a character where damage may be received.  If somebody kicks at your character and it connects with that characters chest, it’s that the hitbox of the kick infiltrated the hurtbox of their chest.

“Sweetspot” – The point of contact between a hitbox and a hurtbox where the most damage and knockback can be dealt.  A very precise location must be hit in order for an attack to sweetspot.

“Trump” – Known as a “Spike” in Super Smash Bros, a trump is any attack where the sweetspot results in sending the opponent downwards with exponential force.  This is most commonly seen in the form of a down-air, since the point of a trump is to send opponents downwards into the blast zone beneath the stage, but there are other interations of trumps as well (For the record, I learned after introducing the term ‘trump’ into “Anarchy” that the same term is used to describe another trick in Smash 4.  I am not going to amend this in the narrative and shall continue referring to trump as I have thus far).

“Fastfall” – When airborne, if a player taps downwards on the directional pad, their character will descend at twice the regular speed.  Used heavily in conjunction with “Short-hopping.”

“Short-hopping” – A light tap of the jump button to generate a jump which barely leaves the ground, rather than extending to the full height of a normal jump.  Primary usefulness lies in giving more versatility to characters who have better standard air attacks than standard ground attacks.

“Edgeguarding” – The attempt to prevent an enemy from returning to the stage after being knocked off by attacking them.  This can be done either by remaining on the stage and sending attacks outwards, off the stage towards the opponent, or by “hunting” the opponent down.

“Hunting” – The attempt to proactively eliminate an opponent after they’ve been knocked off the edge of the stage by chasing after them and killing them outside the safety of the stage.

“Flighty” – A term used to describe an opponent who primarily runs away in a battle, either because they are playing as a character who is better from a distance, or because they have realized they are outmatched and are trying to play defensively to the point most would consider it obnoxious.

“Lag” – The number of successive frames used to measure a character action.  If a character jumps from the stage and lands again, there will be a handful of frames in which no new inputs from the player will be registered.  A better example might be this: Commando Raptor has a notorious move called the Genji Fist.  In “Anarchy” it is said the Genji Fist takes a full second to execute, which is a long time in gameplay standards, since the game runs at sixty-frames-per-second.  So Genji Fist takes the first 30 frames (half a second) to wind up, releases the hitbox forward to damage from frames 31-45 (quarter second), and then has 15 whole frames of animation afterwards in which the character is simply recoiling back into his default position.  These final 15 frames (again, quarter second) are the lag for Genji Fist.  There’s lag for rolling, recovering, dodging, and using every single attack.

“Invincibility frames” – When a character dodges on the ground or in the air, they sort of ‘step out’ of the arena physically for a moment.  Any attack that would have otherwise hit them continues its course without ever making contact.

“Authority” – Known in Smash as “Priority”, authority is the variable which determines which attack takes precedence when two opposing attacks meet simultaneously.  A full-power up-buster is likely to have authority over a down-air in most cases.

“Tech” – A term I wish I didn’t have to copy from the original source material, but couldn’t come up with anything better as a substitute.  Teching is the action of pressing the shield button in the correct frames after being hit and making contact with the stage to nullify all momentum.  This is opposed to not nullifying momentum, and bouncing off the stage like a fish, leaving your character vulnerable for punishment.

The Anarchy Roster

(Every character bullet contains their name, a brief description of the character, their game of origin, their specialty within “Anarchy”, their weight and their tier.  Weight in “Anarchy” *generally* determines how hard it is to kill a character, as well as that character’s movement speed and strength.   Heavier characters are less prone to knockback and thus harder to shoot into the blast zone, but have slower frame rates and greater strength, and vice-versa for light weights.  Tier is divided between A, B, C, D, and E within the competitive community, with A-tier generally being regarded as the most esteemed and formidable tier of characters.  Likewise, E-tier is home to the weakest characters and have the lowest potential for competitive function.  However, because of the nature of “Anarchy”, any character can be good if the human behind the controller is skilled enough.)

Brave – A cybernetic, half-human swordsman from Seeds of Anarchy.  Excels in air-based close-quarter combat.  Medium weight.  A-tier.

Wingull – A bounty hunter who opposes Brave in Seeds of Anarchy.  Excels in grounded close-quarter combat.  Medium weight.  C-tier.

Dax & Petre – The titular monkey and his pet bird from Dax & Petre. Excels in spacing and keeping the opponent at a distance.  Heavy weight.  E-tier.

Shiva – A mystical moon-maiden from Tribute the Truth.  Excels in spacing and keeping the opponent at a distance.  Light weight.  C-tier, though argued to be B-tier.

Bluffy – A clown shinobi from Knuckle Sammich.  Excels in air-based closer-quarter combat and unconventional moves.  Medium weight.  B-tier.

Commando Raptor – A reptilian hunter from Raptor Unit.  Excels in grounded close-quarter combat.  Medium weight.  B-tier.

Solar & Luna – A pair of fraternal, psychic twins from The End and Back.  Excels in all areas and unconventional moves.  Light weight.  A-tier.  Considered one of the most technical and difficult characters in “Anarchy.”

Tu’Vashi – A breakdancing monk from Ravios Drive.  Excels in grounded close-quarter combat.  Medium weight.  A-tier.

Arakid – An arachnid child hero from Arakid.  Excels in air-based close-quarter combat, spacing, and keeping the opponent at a distance.  Light weight.  D-tier.

Lynx – A feline warrior from Knuckle Sammich.  Excels in general close-quarter combat.  Medium weight.  B-tier.

Lady Thrice – A zombie empress from Tales of Otherland.  Excels in spacing and keeping the opponent at a distance.  Heavy weight.  A-tier.

Shiner – Interstellar warlord from Seeds of Victory.  Excels in spacing and keeping the opponent at a distance.  Light weight.  B-tier, some argue A-tier.  Considered one of the most technical and difficult characters in “Anarchy.”

(Dozens of “Anarchy” warriors are yet to be revealed through the narrative).

The anarchists

(The anarchists are the human players of “Anarchy.”  Every character bullet will contain their tag, real name if available, main if available, current status as an anarchist if available (crew association, if any, will be in italics and the five active Anarchy Sovereigns will be underlined).  Details will continue to develop and be revealed throughout the narrative.  Not all characters in this lineup will make a direct appearance in “Anarchy”, but may have an outlying influence.  If a character appears in the story which is not on this list, it is because they do not yet contain enough significance to be catalogued.

Sm0ke – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Active Anarchy Sovereign, American & World Champion, Gunpowder Brotherhood
boss – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown Status: Active Anarchy Sovereign, Anarchy Yakuza
I Am – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Active Anarchy Sovereign, Gunpowder Brotherhood
<3Villains – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Active Anarchy Sovereign, Australian Champion
trueNOVA – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Active Anarchy Sovereign, Silhouettes
Styx – Real name: Unknown, Main: Brave, Status: Retired Anarchy Sovereign, Retired American Champion
Phaaroh – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Gunpowder Brotherhood
Double J – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Chaos Penguin
Spade – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Gunpowder Brotherhood
Lollipop – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional
Master Thief – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Chaos Penguin
Oh Yugi – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Gunpowder Brotherhood
Hanshotfirst – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Chaos Penguin
Captain Derp – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Silhouettes
xprophetx – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Anarchy Yakuza
Yuki Yuki – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Anarchy Yakuza
Ninja lady – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional
The Shire – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Chaos Penguin
Billyboy – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Silhouettes
Sunday Funny – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Expert professional, Silhouettes
The Clansman – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional
Fractal – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional

Myth – Real name: Joel, Main: Brave, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
Od!n – Real name: Perry, Main: Lady Thrice, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
Burndaddy – Real name: Jordan, Main: Brave, Shiner, five unknown, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
Comet* – Real name: Comet, Main: Dax & Petre, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
Merc – Real name: Davis, Main: Shiva, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
GG – Real name: “GG” Garrison, Main: Solar & Luna, Status: Amateur professional, Riotwings
Famine – Real name: Sid, Main: Bluffy, Status: Amateur professional
Zinky – Real name: Unknown, Main: Unknown, Status: Amateur professional
iso – Real name: Unknown, Main: Lynx, Status: Expert professional
R3M1X – Real name: Scott, Main: Tu’Vashi, Status: Amateur professional, Hour of Helix
M-80 – Real name: Unknown, Main: Commando Raptor, Status: Amateur professional, Hour of Helix
Dougie – Real name: Douglas “Dougie”, Main: Wingull, Status: Amateur professional

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